Gold Dome: Trump Submits Responses to Mueller

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President Donald Trump submitted his answers from Special Counsel Robert Mueller on questions about collusion with Russia. The Trump administration is saying they expect the investigation to come to a close soon.

Trump also pardoned two turkeys yesterday, but he did warn them they were likely to receive subpoenas from the Democrats and their pardons might be enjoined by the 9th Circuit.

Gov. John Hickenlooper yesterday asked the Colorado Supreme Court to decide whether two constitutional amendments that affect taxes can coexist and which should be removed if not.

Gov.-elect Jared Polis is not planning on living in the governor’s mansion; he said he will instead make the commute from Boulder.

A recent survey shows that the surge of unaffiliated voters who turned out for Democrats in the midterm elections were motivated by President Trump.

Rep. Joe Neguse talked about his goals now that he’s been elected to Congress and was pressed on whether he had reservations about receiving campaign contributions from Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck in light of information the law firm is continuing its contract with Saudi Arabia.

The overall number of “bias-motivated crimes” has stayed mostly flat in Colorado and has dropped in Denver in the past year. The number number of bias-related incidents, however, has risen. 

The Denver District Attorney’s Office announced yesterday that the office is getting a a nearly $1 million federal grant to help combat human trafficking and help victims in the city.

Despite state prosecutors saying they would work to unseal dozens of criminal cases that have been hidden from the public in recent years, some judges aren’t granting the requests to unseal documents.

Rep. Joe Neguse talked about his goals now that he’s been elected to Congress and was pressed on whether he had reservations about receiving campaign contributions from Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck in light of information the law firm is continuing its contract with Saudi Arabia.

The overall number of “bias-motivated crimes” has stayed mostly flat in Colorado and has dropped in Denver in the past year. The number number of bias-related incidents, however, has risen. 

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